News about Melanoma

Skin cancers include melanoma, basal cell, and squamous cell. Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the melanocytes – the cells that produce the skin coloring or pigment known as melanin. Basal and squamous cell skin cancers are called non-melanomas. Most basal and squamous cell cancers develop on sun-exposed areas of the skin, like the face, ear, neck, lips, and the backs of the hands. Basal cell, squamous cell and melanoma cancers are almost always curable when they are found in the very early stages.
  1. There are many different types of skin blemish, many of which are harmless. Learn about some blemishes, including their appearance, causes, and treatment, here.
  2. New research in mice and cell cultures shows for the first time that a key circular RNA can block the spread of aggressive skin cancer.
  3. Although obesity is a known risk factor for some cancers, its relationship with skin cancer has been harder to pin down. A recent study takes a fresh look.
  4. New research in mice suggests that administering a common antibiotic before radiation therapy can help the immune system fight off cancer.
  5. A recent study investigating the role of papillomaviruses in skin cancer produces surprising results. These viruses may, in fact, protect against cancer.
  6. Scientists have found that manipulating a cell signal, involving vitamin D, can slow the growth of melanoma cells and their advance to the lungs in mice.
  7. Using a new mouse model of human melanoma, scientists show how the aggressive skin cancer can start in immature, pigment producing cells in hair follicles.
  8. Researchers looking at indoor tanning and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma find that the overall number of tanning sessions links to increased risk.
  9. Many people believe that dark skin is not susceptible to sun damage. This is not true. Although darker skin tones are less likely to burn, people of all skin tones can get sunburn or skin cancer. Learn more here.
  10. Moles, or pigmented growths on the skin, are usually harmless. Most appear in childhood, but adults can develop moles, too, and some may turn into melanomas. Find out what to look for here.

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