News about Melanoma

Skin cancers include melanoma, basal cell, and squamous cell. Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the melanocytes – the cells that produce the skin coloring or pigment known as melanin. Basal and squamous cell skin cancers are called non-melanomas. Most basal and squamous cell cancers develop on sun-exposed areas of the skin, like the face, ear, neck, lips, and the backs of the hands. Basal cell, squamous cell and melanoma cancers are almost always curable when they are found in the very early stages.
  1. A recent study followed individuals who had undergone obesity surgery. They found that the procedure significantly reduced their risk of skin cancer.
  2. Subungual hematomas occur after an injury to a nail. An impact can break blood vessels, causing blood to pool underneath the nail. In this article, we look at how to treat a subungal hematoma at home and when to see a doctor. Learn about signs of infection and the difference between this common injury and melanoma.
  3. A malar rash is also known as a butterfly rash and appears on the face. It is usually red or purple and may be blotchy or solid. It can occur alongside many conditions, including lupus and rosacea. Treatment depends on the cause. There are lifestyle tips and tricks that can help. Learn more about the best ones here.
  4. A new study finds that, as melanoma tries to evade treatment, it differentiates into four subtypes. Some of these are vulnerable to treatment.
  5. Study using mice and cells finds that chondroitin-4-sulfate, a widely used dietary supplement for osteoarthritis, drives cell growth in a type of melanoma.
  6. A new study finds that a 'friendly' bacterium, commonly found on healthy human skin and called Staphylococcus epidermidis, may protect against skin cancer.
  7. Researchers are testing a promising new gel-like medium capable of delivering a combination of therapeutic agents directly to the sites of primary tumors.
  8. Researchers used stem cells to create an anti-cancer vaccine, which they tested in 75 mice with various types of cancer. Here's what they found.
  9. A Spitz nevus is a type of noncancerous growth. In this article, learn about the types, diagnosis, and when to see a doctor to check for melanoma.
  10. A look at crepey skin, a common complaint where the skin looks thin and wrinkled. Included is detail on prevention and the role of nutrition.

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