News about Melanoma

Skin cancers include melanoma, basal cell, and squamous cell. Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the melanocytes – the cells that produce the skin coloring or pigment known as melanin. Basal and squamous cell skin cancers are called non-melanomas. Most basal and squamous cell cancers develop on sun-exposed areas of the skin, like the face, ear, neck, lips, and the backs of the hands. Basal cell, squamous cell and melanoma cancers are almost always curable when they are found in the very early stages.
  1. Researchers looking at indoor tanning and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma find that the overall number of tanning sessions links to increased risk.
  2. Many people believe that dark skin is not susceptible to sun damage. This is not true. Although darker skin tones are less likely to burn, people of all skin tones can get sunburn or skin cancer. Learn more here.
  3. Moles, or pigmented growths on the skin, are usually harmless. Most appear in childhood, but adults can develop moles, too, and some may turn into melanomas. Find out what to look for here.
  4. A new study suggests that people who have a higher vitamin A intake may have a lower risk of developing a common form of skin cancer.
  5. Scientists find that fat cells transfer gene-altering proteins to melanoma cells, making them more aggressive. They also show a way to block this process.
  6. Black people can get skin cancer, though it is less likely to affect them than people with lighter skin. For darker-skinned people, it usually occurs on lighter areas of the skin. Learn more here.
  7. According to a large-scale new study, iron levels that are excessively high may cause bacterial skin infections, such as cellulitis and abscesses.
  8. Many people may be tempted to craft their own sunscreens out of all-natural ingredients. However, such creams will likely fail to offer any protection.
  9. Potential causes of a lump on the neck include swollen lymph nodes, acne, and cysts. The type of treatment depends on the cause. Learn more about the various causes of a lump on the neck here.
  10. An international study has identified gut bacteria that activate the immune system to slow melanoma growth in mice and highlights a key signaling pathway.

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